• Lessons
  • Lessons

Lessons

the new novel from the author of Atonement

Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)

Fr.29.90

inkl. gesetzl. MwSt.
eBook

eBook

Fr. 16.00

Lessons

Ebenfalls verfügbar als:

Gebundenes Buch

Gebundenes Buch

ab Fr. 38.90
Taschenbuch

Taschenbuch

ab Fr. 18.90
eBook

eBook

ab Fr. 16.00
  • Kostenlose Lieferung ab Fr. 30 Einkaufswert Mehr erfahren

    Schweiz & Liechtenstein:

    Versandkostenfrei ab Fr. 30.00
    Versandkosten bis Fr. 30.00: Fr. 3.50

    Andere Lieferländer

    Fr. 18.00 unabhängig vom Warenwert

Beschreibung

Details

Verkaufsrang

316

Einband

Taschenbuch

Erscheinungsdatum

13.09.2022

Verlag

Random House Children's Books

Seitenzahl

496

Beschreibung

Rezension

Lessons should have made the Booker longlist (and shortlist) but no matter. It marks a significant new phase in McEwan's already astonishingly productive career - and may well be remembered as one of the finest humanist novels of its age. New Statesman

Details

Verkaufsrang

316

Einband

Taschenbuch

Erscheinungsdatum

13.09.2022

Verlag

Random House Children's Books

Seitenzahl

496

Maße (L/B/H)

23.2/15.2/3.7 cm

Gewicht

596 g

Sprache

Englisch

ISBN

978-1-78733-398-7

Das meinen unsere Kund*innen

5.0

1 Bewertungen

Informationen zu Bewertungen

Zur Abgabe einer Bewertung ist eine Anmeldung im Kund*innenkonto notwendig. Die Authentizität der Bewertungen wird von uns nicht überprüft. Wir behalten uns vor, Bewertungstexte, die unseren Richtlinien widersprechen, entsprechend zu kürzen oder zu löschen.

5 Sterne

(1)

4 Sterne

(0)

3 Sterne

(0)

2 Sterne

(0)

1 Sterne

(0)

Ian McEwan - Lessons

Miss.mesmerized am 11.09.2022

Bewertet: Buch (Gebundene Ausgabe)

Eleven-year-old Roland Baines’ life changes dramatically when his Africa based parents decide to send him back to England to attend a boarding school and get the classic education. While the political landscape forms itself after the Second World War, the boy takes piano lessons with Miss Cornell who will shape not only his idea of music, she will become his first love. Incidentally or initiated by fate, Roland’s life will remain closely connected to global events, be it the cloud coming from Chernobyl, the beginning and end of the Cold War, or major crises such as AIDS and the pandemic. As we travel through his life, he has to learn some lessons, some taken light-heartedly, others a lot harder and leaving scars. I have been a huge fan of Ian McEwan’s novel for years and accordingly, I was keen to open his latest novel “Lessons”. What I have always appreciate most in his books is his carefully crafted characters who – hit by events outside their control – need to cope and to adjust. He is a wonderful narrator who easily makes you sink into the plot and forget everything around you. Even though “Lessons” does not focus that much on a single question as in “The Children Act” or “Saturday” and was much longer than most of his former writings, I hugely enjoyed how his protagonist’s character unfolds in front of us and becomes who he is when his life closes. The novel has been announced as “a chronicle of out times” and admittedly, that’s just what it is. By the example of Roland, he illustrates the last six decades, he chronicles British and European politics, arts, music and mind-set. Roland’s process of learning does not stop, life is a continuous process of trial and error, of mistakes and good decisions which all leave their mark. Interestingly, the protagonist is a rather passive character. He only ever reacts to what happens, his piano teacher’s advances, his wife’s running away, his career: Roland does not actively shape his life, it is the first and foremost the women he encounters who make him move and – even though they all remain minor characters – it’s them who bring the verve and dynamics into the action. I can imagine that some readers will find the novel a bit slow and lacking focus, yet, I totally adored it and enjoyed every minute of the read.

Ian McEwan - Lessons

Miss.mesmerized am 11.09.2022
Bewertet: Buch (Gebundene Ausgabe)

Eleven-year-old Roland Baines’ life changes dramatically when his Africa based parents decide to send him back to England to attend a boarding school and get the classic education. While the political landscape forms itself after the Second World War, the boy takes piano lessons with Miss Cornell who will shape not only his idea of music, she will become his first love. Incidentally or initiated by fate, Roland’s life will remain closely connected to global events, be it the cloud coming from Chernobyl, the beginning and end of the Cold War, or major crises such as AIDS and the pandemic. As we travel through his life, he has to learn some lessons, some taken light-heartedly, others a lot harder and leaving scars. I have been a huge fan of Ian McEwan’s novel for years and accordingly, I was keen to open his latest novel “Lessons”. What I have always appreciate most in his books is his carefully crafted characters who – hit by events outside their control – need to cope and to adjust. He is a wonderful narrator who easily makes you sink into the plot and forget everything around you. Even though “Lessons” does not focus that much on a single question as in “The Children Act” or “Saturday” and was much longer than most of his former writings, I hugely enjoyed how his protagonist’s character unfolds in front of us and becomes who he is when his life closes. The novel has been announced as “a chronicle of out times” and admittedly, that’s just what it is. By the example of Roland, he illustrates the last six decades, he chronicles British and European politics, arts, music and mind-set. Roland’s process of learning does not stop, life is a continuous process of trial and error, of mistakes and good decisions which all leave their mark. Interestingly, the protagonist is a rather passive character. He only ever reacts to what happens, his piano teacher’s advances, his wife’s running away, his career: Roland does not actively shape his life, it is the first and foremost the women he encounters who make him move and – even though they all remain minor characters – it’s them who bring the verve and dynamics into the action. I can imagine that some readers will find the novel a bit slow and lacking focus, yet, I totally adored it and enjoyed every minute of the read.

Unsere Kund*innen meinen

Lessons

von Ian McEwan

5.0

0 Bewertungen filtern

Weitere Artikel finden Sie in

Die Leseprobe wird geladen.
  • Lessons
  • Lessons