Meine Filiale

The Outrun

Nominiert: Wellcome Book Prize, 2016, Ausgezeichnet: Wainwright Prize, 2016, Nominiert: Gordon Burn Prize, 2016, Nominiert: Saltire Society Non-Fiction Book of the Year, 2016, Ausgezeichnet: PEN/Ackerley Prize, 2017

Canons Band 93

Amy Liptrot

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Beschreibung

THE SUNDAY TIMES TOP TEN BESTSELLER
WINNER OF THE 2017 PEN ACKERLEY PRIZE
WINNER OF THE 2016 WAINWRIGHT PRIZE

SHORTLISTED FOR THE 2017 ONDAATJE PRIZE
SHORTLISTED FOR THE 2016 WELLCOME PRIZE

At the age of thirty, Amy Liptrot finds herself washed up back home on Orkney. Standing unstable on the island, she tries to come to terms with the addiction that has swallowed the last decade of her life. As she spends her mornings swimming in the bracingly cold sea, her days tracking Orkney's wildlife, and her nights searching the sky for the Merry Dancers, Amy discovers how the wild can restore life and renew hope.

A lyrical, brave memoir. It's Liptrot's aptitude for marrying her inner-space with wild outer-spaces that makes her such a compelling writer . . . I enjoyed this book enormously WILL SELF Guardian

Liptrot, Amy
Amy Liptrot has published her work with various magazines, journals and blogs and she has written a regular column for Caught by the River out of which The Outrun has emerged. As well as writing for her local newspaper, Orkney Today, and editing the Edinburgh Student newspaper, Amy has worked as an artist's model, a trampolinist and in a shellfish factory. This is her first book.

Produktdetails

Einband Taschenbuch
Seitenzahl 304
Erscheinungsdatum 01.11.2018
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-1-78689-422-9
Reihe The Canons
Verlag Canongate Books Ltd.
Maße (L/B/H) 19.8/12.8/2.2 cm
Gewicht 205 g

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Turning over endless stones looking for a safe place
von einer Kundin/einem Kunden aus Berlin am 08.09.2020
Bewertet: Format: eBook (ePUB)

After reading Charlotte McConaghy’s “Migrations”, I felt the need to return to “The Outrun”, a piece of unkempt pasture that lies between land and sea in the far, far North. This book is a memoir about growing up on the Orkney Islands, remote and in conditions that must have been harsh in almost every respect. Immediately, a vag... After reading Charlotte McConaghy’s “Migrations”, I felt the need to return to “The Outrun”, a piece of unkempt pasture that lies between land and sea in the far, far North. This book is a memoir about growing up on the Orkney Islands, remote and in conditions that must have been harsh in almost every respect. Immediately, a vague vision of wilderness and of pure untouched nature comes to mind: “My life was rough and windy and tangled.” It’s not surprising that a young person would want to escape to the City to get a “real” taste of life, even if it means carrying a part of that home with her always. “Although I’d left, and had wanted to leave, Orkney and the cliffs held me, and when I was away I always had, somewhere inside, a quietly vibrating sense of loss and disturbance. I carried within myself the furious seas, limitless skies and confidence with heights.” The contrast, however, could not be more crass. Her London life and excessive partying turn into severe addiction, and loss is piled upon loss before the author seeks help. Her struggles, her shame and her downfall are narrated with brutal honesty. Defeated, having completed a withdrawal program, she returns to the islands, where the real fight begins, fought in the face of rough but beautiful nature which is described by Liptrot with equal utter beauty. “I’ve swapped disco lights for celestial lights but I’m still surrounded by dancers.” The idyll, however, is thwarted. It means learning to be lonely in extreme remoteness, which must be even more difficult to bear as an addict; one can hardly imagine that it could be done without some degree of being online, also serving as a link to the old life: “I’m keeping in spectral communication with the ghosts of my past.” Learning to cope with all sorts of extremes brings some recovery. “The Outrun” is a real life version of “Migrations”: “The terns that swooped above my head as a child no longer return to the outrun.” “Life is getting sadder but more interesting –all the injuries and hurts, like scars in the coastline, continually worn away.” The Orkney Isles are not “untouched”, as multi-million pounds’ worth of debris from all the failed attempts to win energy from its surrounding natural forces lie smashed up on their shores: "The things we put into the sea come back to us" is a metaphor that works on several levels.


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