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Random Minis: Everything, Everything

The #1 New York Times bestseller Everything, Everything in a groundbreaking new mini format, perfect for on-the-go reading!

Risk everything . . . for love.

What if you couldn't touch anything in the outside world? Never breathe in the fresh air, feel the sun warm your face . . . or kiss the boy next door? In
Everything, Everything, Maddy is a girl who's literally allergic to the outside world, and Olly is the boy who moves in next door . . . and becomes the greatest risk she's ever taken.

My disease is as rare as it is famous. Basically, I'm allergic to the world. I don't leave my house, have not left my house in seventeen years. The only people I ever see are my mom and my nurse, Carla.

But then one day, a moving truck arrives next door. I look out my window, and I see him. He's tall, lean, and wearing all black--black T-shirt, black jeans, black sneakers, and a black knit cap that covers his hair completely. He catches me looking and stares at me. I stare right back. His name is Olly.

Maybe we can't predict the future, but we can predict some things. For example, I am certainly going to fall in love with Olly. It's almost certainly going to be a disaster.

Everything, Everything will make you laugh, cry, and feel everything in between. It's an innovative, inspiring, and heartbreakingly romantic debut novel that unfolds via vignettes, diary entries, illustrations, and more.



Random Minis are super-light, cellphone-sized, unabridged books made to fit into a pocket or one hand without sacrificing readability. Other titles include All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven, Dear Martin by Nic Stone, Every Day by David Levithan, I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika Sánchez, and We Were Liars by E. Lockhart.
Portrait
NICOLA YOON is the author of the #1 New York Times bestsellers The Sun Is Also a Star and Everything, Everything, both of which were turned into major motion pictures. She grew up in Jamaica and Brooklyn and lives in Los Angeles with her family. She's also a hopeless romantic who firmly believes that you can fall in love in an instant and that it can last forever.
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  • BRTHDAE UISH 

     

    “MOVIE NIGHT OR Honor Pictionary or Book Club?” my mom asks while inflating a blood pressure cuff around my arm. She doesn’t mention her favorite of all our post-dinner activities—Phonetic Scrabble. I look up to see that her eyes are already laughing at me.

     

    “Phonetic,” I say.

     

     She stops inflating the cuff. Ordinarily Carla, my full-time nurse, would be taking my blood pressure and filling out my daily health log, but my mom’s given her the day off. It’s my birthday and we always spend the day together, just the two of us.

      

    She puts on her stethoscope so that she can listen to my heartbeat. Her smile fades and is replaced by her more serious doctor’s face. This is the face her patients most often see— slightly distant, professional, and concerned. I wonder if they find it comforting.

     

    Impulsively I give her a quick kiss on the forehead to remind her that it’s just me, her favorite patient, her daughter.

     

     

    She opens her eyes, smiles, and caresses my cheek. I guess if you’re going to be born with an illness that requires constant care, then it’s good to have your mom as your doctor.

     

     

    A few seconds later she gives me her best I’m-the-doctor- and-I’m-afraid-I-have-some-bad-news-for-you face. “It’s your big day. Why don’t we play something you have an actual chance of winning? Honor Pictionary?”

      

    Since regular Pictionary can’t really be played with two people, we invented Honor Pictionary. One person draws and the other person is on her honor to make her best guess. If you guess correctly, the other person scores.

     

    I narrow my eyes at her. “We’re playing Phonetic, and I’m winning this time,” I say confidently, though I have no chance of winning. In all our years of playing Phonetic Scrabble, or Fonetik Skrabbl, I’ve never beaten her at it. The last time we played I came close. But then she devastated me on the final word, playing JEENZ on a triple word score.

     

     “OK.” She shakes her head with mock pity. “Anything you want.” She closes her laughing eyes to listen to the stethoscope.

     

     We spend the rest of the morning baking my traditional birthday cake of vanilla sponge with vanilla cream frosting. After it’s cooled, I apply an unreasonably thin layer of frosting, just enough to cover the cake. We are, both of us, cake people, not frosting people. For decoration, I draw eighteen frosted daisies with white petals and a white center across the top. On the sides I fashion draped white curtains.

      

    “Perfect.” My mom peers over my shoulders as I finish up. “Just like you.”

      

    I turn to face her. She’s smiling a wide, proud smile at me, but her eyes are bright with tears.

    “You. Are. Tragic,” I say, and squirt a dollop of frosting on her nose, which only makes her laugh and cry some more. Really, she’s not usually this emotional, but something about my birthday always makes her both weepy and joyful at the same time. And if she’s weepy and joyful, then I’m weepy and joyful, too.

     

    “I know,” she says, throwing her hands helplessly up in the air. “I’m totally pathetic.” She pulls me into a hug and squeezes. Frosting gets into my hair.

      

    My birthday is the one day of the year that we’re both most acutely aware of my illness. It’s the acknowledging of the passage of time that does it. Another whole year of being sick, no hope for a cure on the horizon. Another year of missing all the normal teenagery things—learner’s permit, first kiss, prom, first heartbreak, first fender bender. Another year of my mom doing nothing but working and taking care of me. Every other day these omissions are easy—easier, at least—to ignore.

     

    This year is a little harder than the previous. Maybe it’s because I’m eighteen now. Technically, I’m an adult. I should be leaving home, going off to college. My mom should be dreading empty-nest syndrome. But because of SCID, I’m not going anywhere.

      

    Later, after dinner, she gives me a beautiful set of watercolor pencils that had been on my wish list for months. We go into the living room and sit cross-legged in front of the coffee table. This is also part of our birthday ritual: She lights a single candle in the center of the cake. I close my eyes and make a wish. I blow the candle out.

      

    “What did you wish for?” she asks as soon as I open my eyes.

      

    Really there’s only one thing to wish for—a magical cure that will allow me to run free outside like a wild animal. But I never make that wish because it’s impossible. It’s like wishing that mermaids and dragons and unicorns were real. Instead I wish for something more likely than a cure. Something less likely to make us both sad.

     

     “World peace,” I say.

     

    Three slices of cake later, we begin a game of Fonetik. I do not win. I don’t even come close.

     

    She uses all seven letters and puts down POKALIP next to an 
    S. POKALIPS.

      

    “What’s that?” I ask.

      

    “Apocalypse,” she says, eyes dancing.

     

    “No, Mom. No way. I can’t give that to you.” 

      

    “Yes,” is all she says.

     

    “Mom, you need an extra 
    A. No way.”

      

    “Pokalips,” she says for effect, gesturing at the letters. “It totally works.”

     

    I shake my head.

      

    “P O K A L I P S,” she insists, slowly dragging out the word.

      

    “Oh my God, you’re relentless,” I say, throwing my hands up. “OK, OK, I’ll allow it.”

      

    “Yesssss.” She pumps her fist and laughs at me and marks down her now-insurmountable score. “You’ve never really understood this game,” she says. “It’s a game of persuasion.”

     

    I slice myself another piece of cake. “That was not persuasion,” I say. “That was cheating.”

     

    “Same same,” she says, and we both laugh.

      

    “You can beat me at Honor Pictionary tomorrow,” she says. 

     

    After I lose, we go to the couch and watch our favorite movie, 
    Young Frankenstein. Watching it is also part of our birthday ritual. I put my head in her lap, and she strokes my hair, and we laugh at the same jokes in the same way that we’ve been laughing at them for years. All in all, not a bad way to spend your eighteenth birthday.
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Beschreibung

Produktdetails

Einband Taschenbuch
Seitenzahl 648
Altersempfehlung ab 12
Erscheinungsdatum 22.10.2019
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-0-593-12608-0
Verlag Random House LCC US
Maße (L/B) 7.9/11.7 cm
Gewicht 188 g
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
Fr. 13.90
Fr. 13.90
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Erscheint demnächst,  Kostenlose Lieferung ab Fr.  30 i
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Einfach nur wunderschön!
von einer Kundin/einem Kunden aus Ostermundigen am 15.01.2018
Bewertet: Einband: Taschenbuch

Dieses Buch muss man einfach lesen. Es ist so romantisch und schön!

Was bist Du bereit, für ein normales Leben zu riskieren?
von einer Kundin/einem Kunden am 25.06.2017
Bewertet: Einband: Taschenbuch

Nicola Yoon erzählt die Geschichte von Maddy, die durch eine Immunkrankheit seit ihrer Kindheit ans Haus gefesselt ist. Sie hat sich mit ihrem Schicksal abgefunden, doch als Olly ins Nachbarhaus zieht, merkt Maddy, dass es ihr plötzlich nicht mehr reicht, die Welt nur durch das Fenster zu sehen. "Everything, Everything" ist ei... Nicola Yoon erzählt die Geschichte von Maddy, die durch eine Immunkrankheit seit ihrer Kindheit ans Haus gefesselt ist. Sie hat sich mit ihrem Schicksal abgefunden, doch als Olly ins Nachbarhaus zieht, merkt Maddy, dass es ihr plötzlich nicht mehr reicht, die Welt nur durch das Fenster zu sehen. "Everything, Everything" ist ein toll erzählter All Age-Roman, der zum nachdenken anregt und einfach wunderschön zu lesen ist! Die vielen Zeichnungen und kurzen "Extra-Kapitel" machen es zu einem besonderen Leseerlebnis.

Wunderschöne Love-Story <3
von einer Kundin/einem Kunden aus Wien am 22.02.2017
Bewertet: Format: eBook (ePUB)

Ja, das ist eine süße Geschichte über die Liebe zweier junger Menschen. Aber es ist noch so viel mehr. In dieser Geschichte geht es um Freundschaft und Vertrauen, die kleinen Dinge des Lebens und die großen, um Entscheidungen, Ursache und Wirkung, um die Chaos Theorie und die Lebensweisheiten aus Büchern und vor allem um M... Ja, das ist eine süße Geschichte über die Liebe zweier junger Menschen. Aber es ist noch so viel mehr. In dieser Geschichte geht es um Freundschaft und Vertrauen, die kleinen Dinge des Lebens und die großen, um Entscheidungen, Ursache und Wirkung, um die Chaos Theorie und die Lebensweisheiten aus Büchern und vor allem um Mut und Liebe, wie sie einen verändern kann - zum Guten, aber auch zum Schlechten. Maddy ist krank. Sie war es schon ihr ganzes Leben und wird es immer sein. Damit hat sie sich abgefunden, hat ihre Routine, ihre Freude an Dingen. Sie darf nur nicht an das denken, was draußen ist, an die Welt, die sie verpasst. Und das tut sie nicht. Bis Olly im Haus nebenan einzieht. Er ist ein absoluter Kontrast zu ihr. Und er stellt ihre Welt auf den Kopf. Aus der Ich-Erzählung werden Maddys Gedanken perfekt eingefangen. Mit Book Reviews, Zusammenfassungen, Skizzen und Plänen, mit all ihren Gefühlen und Hoffnungen, den Gedanken. Die Aufmachung des Buches ist großartig - auch als eBook. Die Zeichnungen, die Unterhaltungen über IM. Es fühlt sich echt an, so sehr, dass Maddy und Olly Leben eingehaucht bekommen. Und das macht dieses Buch so wunderbar. Man will wissen, wie es weiter geht, was geschieht. Man hofft mit ihnen, leidet mit ihnen, liebt mit ihnen. Daher: Zückt die Taschentücher und stellt euch auf eine Achterbahn der Gefühle ein. (Und hoffentlich in der Verfilmung erneut!)