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The Book of Lost Things

John Connolly

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Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
Fr. 19.90
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Beschreibung

High in his attic bedroom, twelve-year-old David mourns the death of his mother, with only the books on his shelf for company. But those books have begun to whisper to him in the darkness. Angry and alone, he takes refuge in his imagination and soon finds that reality and fantasy have begun to meld. While his family falls apart around him, David is violently propelled into a world that is a strange reflection of his own -- populated by heroes and monsters and ruled by a faded king who keeps his secrets in a mysterious book, The Book of Lost Things.

Taking readers on a vivid journey through the loss of innocence into adulthood and beyond, New York Times bestselling author John Connolly tells a dark and compelling tale that reminds us of the enduring power of stories in our lives.

Produktdetails

Einband Taschenbuch
Seitenzahl 470
Erscheinungsdatum 01.10.2007
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-0-7432-9890-2
Verlag Washington Square Press
Maße (L/B/H) 21.3/13.8/3.3 cm
Gewicht 404 g

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NOT a children's novel!
von einer Kundin/einem Kunden am 01.08.2019
Bewertet: Einband: Taschenbuch

What a weird little book. The protagonist is a small boy, yet the story is gruesome and cruel. The fairy tale retelling does not shy away from taboo topics such as necromancy, sodomy, torture and many more. While some characters like the dwarves were entertaining, I could not connect with any of the characters and honestly didn... What a weird little book. The protagonist is a small boy, yet the story is gruesome and cruel. The fairy tale retelling does not shy away from taboo topics such as necromancy, sodomy, torture and many more. While some characters like the dwarves were entertaining, I could not connect with any of the characters and honestly didn't care for them. The moral of the story was fit for a young audience, while the tone of the book was not. I did appreciate the inclusion of queerness in a medieval setting, but all in all the story was simply a character test for the protagonist and the growth did not seem organic. He is only starting school and yet the novel paints him as becoming a man through the acts of killing and defending, which in my opinion makes him a traumatized child, not a man. Especially set against the backdrop of his home being ravaged by war it is odd. The antagonist was well written though and I really liked the inclusion of the original tales and the author's notes and thoughts on them in the appendix.

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