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Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe

Benjamin Alire Sáenz

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Buch (gebundene Ausgabe, Englisch)
Buch (gebundene Ausgabe, Englisch)
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Beschreibung

Aristotle is an angry teen with a brother in prison. Dante is a know-it-all who has an unusual way of looking at the world. When they meet at the swimming pool, they seem to have nothing in common. But as the two loners start spending time together, they discover that they share a special kind of friendship--the kind that changes lives and lasts a lifetime.

Benjamin Alire Sáenz is an author of poetry and prose for adults and teens. He is the winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award and the American Book Award for his books for adults. 
Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe was a Printz Honor Book, the Stonewall Award winner, the Pura Belpre Award winner, the Lambda Literary Award winner, and a finalist for the Amelia Elizabeth Walden Award. His first novel for teens, 
Sammy and Juliana in Hollywood, was an ALA Top Ten Book for Young Adults and a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. His second book for teens, 
He Forgot to Say Goodbye, won the Tomás Rivera Mexican American Children’s Book Award, the Southwest Book Award, and was named a New York Public Library Book for the Teen Age. He teaches creative writing at the University of Texas, El Paso.

Produktdetails

Einband gebundene Ausgabe
Seitenzahl 368
Altersempfehlung 12 - 99 Jahr(e)
Erscheinungsdatum 01.02.2012
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-1-4424-0892-0
Verlag Simon & Schuster N.Y.
Maße (L/B/H) 21.8/14.6/3.2 cm
Gewicht 443 g

Kundenbewertungen

Durchschnitt
13 Bewertungen
Übersicht
12
1
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0
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Eines der schönsten Bücher, die ich bisher gelesen habe
von einer Kundin/einem Kunden am 12.01.2021
Bewertet: Einband: Taschenbuch

Ein wirklich wunderbares Buch von Benjamin Alire Sáenz! Es ist ein Coming-of-Age-Roman, dessen Fokus auf den Themen Selbstfindung und Familie liegt. Die Charaktere sind absolut liebenswert. Besonders gut gefallen haben mir die Elternfiguren. Sie bieten Aristotle und Dante den nötigen Raum zur freien Entfaltung und zum Erwachsenw... Ein wirklich wunderbares Buch von Benjamin Alire Sáenz! Es ist ein Coming-of-Age-Roman, dessen Fokus auf den Themen Selbstfindung und Familie liegt. Die Charaktere sind absolut liebenswert. Besonders gut gefallen haben mir die Elternfiguren. Sie bieten Aristotle und Dante den nötigen Raum zur freien Entfaltung und zum Erwachsenwerden. Sáenz' Schreibstil ist sehr poetisch und einfühlsam. Für Leute, die Wert auf einen spannenden und schnellen Plot legen, ist dieser Roman m. M. n. eher ungeeignet, da sein Fokus auf dem - teilweise langatmigen - Prozess des Aufwachsens liegt. Ich freue mich schon sehr auf die Fortsetzung :)

(don't have a title for this one)
von someone am 13.11.2020
Bewertet: Einband: Taschenbuch

Oh, oh, oh. This book. This story. At first glance it may not seem like a lot but it's full of good quotes and just wonderful. I'm not gonna go into the plot, that's what the blurb is for. Just know this: Ari's way of thinking is really nice, and the way it's written fits it perfectly. It's a "simple" coming-of-age story and Ari... Oh, oh, oh. This book. This story. At first glance it may not seem like a lot but it's full of good quotes and just wonderful. I'm not gonna go into the plot, that's what the blurb is for. Just know this: Ari's way of thinking is really nice, and the way it's written fits it perfectly. It's a "simple" coming-of-age story and Ari and Dante share a beautiful relationship that's so precious. This book holds a special place in my heart - it's just so comforting and calm and soft. If you're into these kinds of stories please just give a try.

A wonderful, poetic friendship between two mexican boys in the middle of puberty.
von einer Kundin/einem Kunden am 08.06.2019
Bewertet: Format: eBook (ePUB)

Aristotle, Ari for short, is a boy who's really bad with words. And he can't swim. Until he meet Dante. A poetic boy that has an entirely different view on life than Ari does, but somehow the get along great. At least for the most part. They go through a lot of difficult situations - some alone, some together, while growing a lo... Aristotle, Ari for short, is a boy who's really bad with words. And he can't swim. Until he meet Dante. A poetic boy that has an entirely different view on life than Ari does, but somehow the get along great. At least for the most part. They go through a lot of difficult situations - some alone, some together, while growing a long friendship and perhaps even more. This book is a perfectly written story about family, friendship, forgiveness and what it means to grow up as a queer person in the late 80s.


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  • One

    ONE SUMMER NIGHT I FELL ASLEEP, HOPING THE WORLD would be different when I woke. In the morning, when I opened my eyes, the world was the same. I threw off the sheets and lay there as the heat poured in through my open window.

    My hand reached for the dial on the radio. “Alone” was playing. Crap, “Alone,” a song by a group called Heart. Not my favorite song. Not my favorite group. Not my favorite topic. “You don’t know how long . . .”

    I was fifteen.

    I was bored.

    I was miserable.

    As far as I was concerned, the sun could have melted the blue right off the sky. Then the sky could be as miserable as I was.

    The DJ was saying annoying, obvious things like, “It’s summer! It’s hot out there!” And then he put on that retro Lone Ranger tune, something he liked to play every morning because he thought it was a hip way to wake up the world. “Hi-yo, Silver!” Who hired this guy? He was killing me. I think that as we listened to the William Tell Overture, we were supposed to be imagining the Lone Ranger and Tonto riding their horses through the desert. Maybe someone should have told that guy that we all weren’t ten-year-olds anymore. “Hi-yo, Silver!” Crap. The DJ’s voice was on the airwaves again: “Wake up, El Paso! It’s Monday, June fifteenth, 1987! 1987! Can you believe it? And a big ‘Happy Birthday’ goes out to Waylon Jennings, who’s fifty years old today!” Waylon Jennings? This was a rock station, dammit! But then he said something that hinted at the fact that he might have a brain. He told the story about how Waylon Jennings had survived the 1959 plane crash that killed Buddy Holly and Richie Valens. On that note, he put on the remake of “La Bamba” by Los Lobos.

    “La Bamba.” I could cope with that.

    I tapped my bare feet on the wood floor. As I nodded my head to the beat, I started wondering what had gone through Richie Valens’s head before the plane crashed into the unforgiving ground.
    Hey, Buddy! The music’s over.

    For the music to be over so soon. For the music to be over when it had just begun. That was really sad.

    © 2012 Benjamin Alire Sáenz