The Boys of '67

Charlie Company's War in Vietnam

Andrew Wiest

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Beschreibung

In the spring of 1966, while the war in Vietnam was still popular, the US military decided to reactivate the 9th Infantry Division as part of the military build-up. Across the nation, farm boys from the Midwest, surfers from California and city-slickers from Cleveland opened their mail to find greetings from Uncle Sam. Most American soldiers of the Vietnam era trickled into the war zone as individual replacements for men who had become casualties or had rotated home. Charlie Company was different as part of the only division raised, drafted and trained for service. From draft to the battlefields of South Vietnam, this is the unvarnished truth from the fear of death to the chaos of battle, told almost entirely through the recollections of the men themselves. This is their story, the story of young draftees who had done everything that their nation had asked of them and had received so little in return - lost faces of a distant war.

Dr Andrew Wiest is University Distinguished Professor of History and founding director of the Dale Center for the Study of War & Society at the University of Southern Mississippi. Specializing in the study of World War I and Vietnam, his titles include Vietnam's Forgotten Army, which won the Society for Military History's Distinguished Book Award and The Boys of '67, the basis for the Emmy-nominated National Geographic Channel Documentary Brothers in War. He is based in Hattiesburg, MS.

Produktdetails

Kopierschutz Ja i
Family Sharing Nein i
Text-to-Speech Nein i
Erscheinungsdatum 20.09.2012
Verlag Bloomsbury USA
Seitenzahl 376 (Printausgabe)
Dateigröße 10751 KB
Sprache Englisch
EAN 9781780968940

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