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How Not to Be Wrong: The Power of Mathematical Thinking

The Power of Mathematical Thinking

Jordan Ellenberg

Buch (gebundene Ausgabe, Englisch)
Buch (gebundene Ausgabe, Englisch)
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    Penguin Books Ltd

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    Penguin LCC US

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  • Ellenberg, J: How Not To Be Wrong

    Allen Lane

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Beschreibung

“Brilliantly engaging . . . Ellenberg’s talent for finding real-life situations that enshrine mathematical principles would be the envy of any math teacher. He presents these in fluid succession, like courses in a fine restaurant, taking care to make each insight shine through, unencumbered by jargon or notation. Part of the sheer intellectual joy of the book is watching the author leap nimbly from topic to topic, comparing slime molds to the Bush-Gore Florida vote, criminology to Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony. The final effect is of one enormous mosaic unified by mathematics.” —Manil Suri, The Washington Post

“Refreshingly lucid while still remaining conceptually rigorous, this book lends insight into how mathematicians think—and shows us how we can start to think like mathematicians as well.” —The New York Times

“Easy-to-follow, humorously presented. . . . This book will help you to avoid the pitfalls that result from not having the right tools. It will help you realize that mathematical reasoning permeates our lives—that it can be, as Mr. Ellenberg writes, a kind of ‘X-ray specs that reveal hidden structures underneath the messy and chaotic surface of the world.’” —Mario Livio, The Wall Street Journal

“Witty, compelling, and just plain fun to read. . . . How Not to Be Wrong can help you explore your mathematical superpowers.” —Evelyn Lamb, Scientific American

“A poet-mathematician offers an empowering and entertaining primer for the age of Big Data . . . A rewarding popular math book for just about anyone.” —Laura Miller, Salon

“Mathematicians from Charles Lutwidge Dodgson to Steven Strogatz have celebrated the power of mathematics in life and the imagination. In this hugely enjoyable exploration of everyday maths as ‘an atomic-powered prosthesis that you attach to your common sense,’ Jordan Ellenberg joins their ranks. Ellenberg, an academic and Slate’s ‘Do the Math’ columnist, explains key principles with erudite gusto—whether poking holes in predictions of a US ‘obesity apocalypse,’ or unpicking an attempt by psychologist B. F. Skinner to prove statistically that Shakespeare was a dud at alliteration.” —Nature

“A fresh application of complex mathematical thinking to commonplace events. . . . How Not to Be Wrong is beautifully written, holding the reader’s attention throughout with well-chosen material, illuminating exposition, wit and helpful examples. I am reminded of the great writer of recreational mathematics, Martin Gardner: Ellenberg shares Gardner’s remarkable ability to write clearly and entertainingly, bringing in deep mathematical ideas without the reader registering their difficulty.” —Times Higher Education

“[Ellenberg] writes that, at its core, math is a special thing and produces a feeling of understanding unattainable elsewhere: ‘You feel you’ve reached into the universe’s guts and put your hand on the wire.’ . . . Witty and expansive, Ellenberg’s math will leave readers informed, intrigued and armed with plenty of impressive conversation starters.” —Kirkus

“Ellenberg writes with humor and verve as he repeatedly demonstrates that mathematics simply extends common sense. He manages to translate even the work of theoretical pioneers such as Cantor and Gödel into the language of intelligent amateurs. The surprises that await readers include not only a discovery of the astonishing versatility of mathematical thinking but also a realization of its very real limits.” —Booklist

“The title of this wonderful book explains what it adds to the honorable genre of popular writing on mathematics. Like Lewis Carroll, George Gamow, and Martin Gardner before him, Jordan Ellenberg shows how mathematics can delight and stimulate the mind. But he also shows that mathematical thinking should be in the toolkit of every thoughtful person—of everyone who wants to avoid fallacies, superstitions, and other ways of being wrong.” —Steven Pinker, Johnstone Family Professor of Psychology, Harvard University; author of How the Mind Works

“With math as with anything else, there’s smart, and then there’s street smart. This book will help you be both. Fans of Freakonomics and The Signal and the Noise will love Ellenberg’s surprising stories, snappy writing, and brilliant lessons in numerical savvy. How Not to Be Wrong is sharp, funny, and right.” —Steven Strogatz, Schurman Professor of Applied Mathematics, Cornell University, and author, The Joy of x

“Through a powerful mathematical lens Jordan Ellenberg engagingly examines real-world issues ranging from the fetishizing of straight lines in the reporting of obesity to the game theory of missing flights, from the relevance to digestion of regression to the mean to the counter-intuitive Berkson’s paradox, which may explain why handsome men don’t seem to be as nice as not so handsome ones. The coverage is broad, but not shallow and the exposition is non-technical and sprightly.” —John Allen Paulos, author of Innumeracy and A Mathematician Reads the Newspaper

“Jordan Ellenberg promises to share ways of thinking that are both simple to grasp and profound in their implications, and he delivers in spades. These beautifully readable pages delight and enlighten in equal parts. Those who already love math will eat it up, and those who don’t yet know how lovable math is are in for a most pleasurable surprise.” —Rebecca Newberger Goldstein, author of Plato at the Googleplex

Jordan Ellenberg is the John D. MacArthur Professor of Mathematics at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. His writing has appeared in
Slate,
The Wall Street Journal,
The New York Times,
The Washington Post,
The Boston Globe, and
The
Believer.

Produktdetails

Einband gebundene Ausgabe
Seitenzahl 480
Altersempfehlung ab 18 Jahr(e)
Erscheinungsdatum 29.05.2014
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-1-59420-522-4
Verlag Penguin Books USA
Maße (L/B/H) 24.1/15.9/3 cm
Gewicht 712 g

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