Ellner, A: When Soldiers Say No

Selective Conscientious Objection in the Modern Military

Andrea Ellner, Paul Robinson

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Beschreibung

A decade of conflict not clearly aligned to vital national interests combined with recent acts of selective conscientious objection by members of the military have led some to reappraise the distinction between absolute and selective conscious objection, and argue that selective conscientious objection ought to be legally recognised and permitted.

Andrea Ellner is in the Defence Studies Department of King’s College London, UK, Paul Robinson is a professor in the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Ottawa, Canada and David Whetham is Senior Lecturer in Defence Studies at King’s College London, based at the Joint Services Command and Staff College at the UK Defence Academy.

Produktdetails

Einband gebundene Ausgabe
Erscheinungsdatum 15.01.2014
Verlag Ashgate Pub CO
Seitenzahl 296
Maße (L/B/H) 16.3/24/2.4 cm
Gewicht 680 g
Reihe Military and Defence Ethics
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-1-4724-1214-0

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  • Contents: Preface; Introduction: 'sometime they'll give a war and nobody will come', Andrea Ellner, Paul Robinson and David Whetham; Part I Arguments For and Against Accepting Selective Conscientious Objection: The duty of diligence: knowledge, responsibility, and selectiveconscientious objection, Brian Imiola; There is no real moral obligation to obey orders: escaping from 'low-cost deontology', Emmanuel R. Goffi; Selective conscientious objection: a violation of the social contract, Melissa Bergeron; Who guards the guards? The importance of civilian control of the military, David Fisher; An empirical defense of combat moral equality, Michael Skerker; Selective conscientious objection and the just society, Dan Zupan. Part II Case Studies in Selective Conscientious Objection: Selective conscientious objection in Australia, Stephen Coleman and Nikki Coleman, with Richard Adams; Conscientious objection to military service in Britain, Stephen Deakin; Selective conscientious objection: philosophical and conceptual doubts in light of Israeli cas law, Yossi Nehushtan; Claims for refugee protection in Canada by selective objectors: an evolving jurisprudence, Yves Le Bouthillier; Conscience in lieu of obedience: cases of selective conscientious objection in the German Bundeswehr, Jurgen Rose: Part III Conclusions: Selective conscientious objection: some guidelines for implementation, J. Carl Ficarrotta; War resisters in the US and Britain - supporting the case for a right to selective conscientious objection?, Andrea Ellner; The practice and philosophy of selective conscientious objection, Andrea Ellner, Paul Robinson and David Whetham; Bibliography; Index.