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Rogue Lawyer

A Novel

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE WASHINGTON POST AND NPR • Featuring one of John Grisham's most colorful, outrageous, and vividly drawn characters yet, Rogue Lawyer showcases the master of the legal thriller at his very best.

On the right side of the law-sort of-Sebastian Rudd is not your typical street lawyer. His office is a customized bulletproof van, complete with Wi-Fi, a bar, a small fridge, and fine leather chairs. He has no firm, no partners, and only one employee: his heavily armed driver, who also so happens to be his bodyguard, law clerk, confidant, and golf caddie. Sebastian drinks small-batch bourbon and carries a gun. He defends people other lawyers won't go near: a drug-addled, tattooed kid rumored to be in a satanic cult; a vicious crime lord on death row; a homeowner arrested for shooting at a SWAT team that mistakenly invaded his house. Why these clients? Because Sebastian believes everyone is entitled to a fair trial-even if he has to bend the law to secure one.

Praise for Rogue Lawyer

"Terrific . . . inventive . . . Grisham still makes it look easy."-Maureen Corrigan, The Washington Post

"Sebastian Rudd is . . . a kind of twenty-first-century Philip Marlowe . . . with a blunt, rude, gravelly poetic wiseguy voice."-Benjamin Percy, The New York Times Book Review

"Deeply engaging and entertaining . . . [Grisham finds] intense drama in the little skirmishes that play out across our legal system every day."-Charles Finch, USA Today

"Grisham has taken a step in an intriguing new direction."-Janet Maslin, The New York Times
Rezension
"Terrific . . . inventive . . . John Grisham still makes it look easy."-Maureen Corrigan, The Washington Post

"Sebastian Rudd is . . . a kind of twenty-first-century Philip Marlowe . . . with a blunt, rude, gravelly poetic wiseguy voice."-Benjamin Percy, The New York Times Book Review

"Deeply engaging and entertaining . . . [Grisham finds] intense drama in the little skirmishes that play out across our legal system every day."-Charles Finch, USA Today

"Grisham has taken a step in an intriguing new direction."-Janet Maslin, The New York Times
Portrait
John Grisham is the author of twenty-eight novels, one work of nonfiction, a collection of stories, and six novels for young readers.
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    My name is Sebastian Rudd, and though I am a well‑known street lawyer, you will not see my name on billboards, on bus benches, or screaming at you from the yellow pages. I don't pay to be seen on television, though I am often there. My name is not listed in any phone book. I do not maintain a traditional office. I carry a gun, legally, because my name and face tend to attract attention from the type of people who also carry guns and don't mind using them. I live alone, usually sleep alone, and do not possess the patience and understanding necessary to maintain friendships. The law is my life, always consuming and occasionally fulfilling. I wouldn't call it a "jealous mistress" as some forgotten person once so famously did. It's more like an overbearing wife who controls the checkbook. There's no way out.
    These nights I find myself sleeping in cheap motel rooms that change each week. I'm not trying to save money; rather, I'm just trying to stay alive. There are plenty of people who'd like to kill me right now, and a few of them have been quite vocal. They don't tell you in law school that one day you may find yourself defending a person charged with a crime so heinous that otherwise peaceful citizens feel driven to take up arms and threaten to kill the accused, his lawyer, and even the judge.
    But I've been threatened before. It's part of being a rogue lawyer, a subspecialty of the profession that I more or less fell into ten years ago. When I finished law school, jobs were scarce. I reluctantly took a part‑time position in the City's public defender's office. From there I landed in a small, unprofitable firm that handled only criminal defense. After a few years, that firm blew up and I was on my own, out on the street with plenty of others, scrambling to make a buck.
    One case put me on the map. I can't say it made me famous because, seriously, how can you say a lawyer is famous in a city of a million people? Plenty of local hacks think they're famous. They smile from billboards as they beg for your bankruptcy and swagger in television ads as they seem deeply concerned about your personal injuries, but they're forced to pay for their own publicity. Not me.
    The cheap motels change each week. I'm in the middle of a trial in a dismal, backwater, redneck town called Milo, two hours from where I live in the City. I am defending a brain‑damaged eighteen‑year‑old dropout who's charged with killing two little girls in one of the most evil crimes I've ever seen, and I've seen plenty. My clients are almost always guilty, so I don't waste a lot of time wringing my hands about whether they get what they deserve. In this case, though, Gardy is not guilty, not that it matters. It does not. What's important in Milo these days is that Gardy gets convicted and sentenced to death and executed as soon as possible so that the town can feel better about itself and move on. Move on to where, exactly? Hell if I know, nor do I care. This place has been moving backward for fifty years, and one lousy verdict will not change its course. I've read and heard it said that Milo needs "closure," whatever that means. You'd have to be an idiot to believe this town will somehow grow and prosper and become more tolerant as soon as Gardy gets the needle.
    My job is layered and complicated, and at the same time it's quite simple. I'm being paid by the State to provide a first‑class defense to a defendant charged with capital murder, and this requires me to fight and claw and raise hell in a courtroom where no one is listening. Gardy was essentially convicted the day he was arrested, and his trial is only a formality. The dumb and desperate cops trumped up the charges and fabricated the evidence. The prosecutor knows this but has no spine and is up for reelection next year. The judge is asleep. The jurors are basically nice, simple people, wide‑eyed at the process a
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Beschreibung

Produktdetails

Einband Taschenbuch
Seitenzahl 400
Erscheinungsdatum 01.05.2016
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-1-101-96586-3
Verlag Random House LCC US
Maße (L/B/H) 17.5/10.8/3.2 cm
Gewicht 198 g
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
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Fr. 15.90
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von Peter Fischer aus Luzern am 18.09.2016
Bewertet: Einband: Taschenbuch

Die Geschichten und Texte sind unbeschreiblich, Atem beraubend, sozialkritisch. Einfach ein Muss! Aber Achtung: die verwendete (englische) Sprache verlangt wirklich gute Englischkenntnisse. Und auch so ...