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Factfulness

Ten Reasons We're Wrong About The World - And Why Things Are Better Than You Think

'One of the most important books I've ever read - an indispensable guide to thinking clearly about the world.' BILL GATES

'Hans Rosling tells the story of "the secret silent miracle of human progress" as only he can. But Factfulness does much more than that. It also explains why progress is so often secret and silent and teaches readers how to see it clearly.' MELINDA GATES

Factfulness: The stress-reducing habit of only carrying opinions for which you have strong supporting facts.

When asked simple questions about global trends - why the world's population is increasing; how many young women go to school; how many of us live in poverty - we systematically get the answers wrong. So wrong that a chimpanzee choosing answers at random will consistently outguess journalists, Nobel laureates, and investment bankers.

In Factfulness, Professor of International Health and a man who can make data sing, Hans Rosling, together with his two long-time collaborators Anna and Ola, offers a radical new explanation of why this happens, and reveals the ten instincts that distort our perspective.

It turns out that the world, for all its imperfections, is in a much better state than we might think. But when we worry about everything all the time instead of embracing a worldview based on facts, we can lose our ability to focus on the things that threaten us most.

Inspiring and revelatory, filled with lively anecdotes and moving stories, Factfulness is an urgent and essential book that will change the way you see the world.

Rezension
A hopeful book about the potential for human progress when we work off facts rather than our inherent biases. Barack Obama
Portrait

Hans Rosling was a medical doctor, professor of international health and renowned public educator. He was an adviser to the World Health Organization and UNICEF, and co-founded Médecins sans Frontières in Sweden and the Gapminder Foundation. His TED talks have been viewed more than 35 million times, and he was listed as one of Time Magazine's 100 most influential people in the world. Hans died in 2017, having devoted the last years of his life to writing this book.

Ola Rosling and Anna Rosling Rönnlund, Hans's son and daughter-in-law, were co-founders of the Gapminder Foundation, and Ola its director from 2005 to 2007 and from 2010 to the present day. After Google acquired the bubble-chart tool called Trendalyzer, invented and designed by Anna and Ola, Ola became head of Google's Public Data Team and Anna the team's senior user experience (UX) designer. They have both received international awards for their work.

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Beschreibung

Produktdetails

Einband Taschenbuch
Seitenzahl 352
Erscheinungsdatum 04.04.2019
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-1-4736-3747-4
Verlag Hodder And Stoughton
Maße (L/B/H) 17.7/11.1/2.7 cm
Gewicht 195 g
Verkaufsrang 2214
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
Fr. 15.90
Fr. 15.90
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von einer Kundin/einem Kunden am 05.10.2019
Bewertet: Einband: gebundene Ausgabe

Ein Buch, das man gelesen haben sollte. Auch wenn man nicht mit dem ganzen Inhalt einverstanden ist, wird man einige kritische Denkanstösse finden. Absolut zu empfehlen.

Think different
von einer Kundin/einem Kunden am 01.10.2019
Bewertet: Einband: Taschenbuch

In dem Buch zeigt Hans Rosling auf eindrucksvolle Weise, dass die Weltanschauung stark vom Standpunkt abhängt. Er veranschaulicht welche gedanklichen Mechanismen arbeiten, wenn wir versuchen eine komplexe Welt in schwarz-weiß, arm-reich, Westliche Welt - der Rest etc. zu unterteilen. Das öffnet die Möglichkeit, kritischer und eb... In dem Buch zeigt Hans Rosling auf eindrucksvolle Weise, dass die Weltanschauung stark vom Standpunkt abhängt. Er veranschaulicht welche gedanklichen Mechanismen arbeiten, wenn wir versuchen eine komplexe Welt in schwarz-weiß, arm-reich, Westliche Welt - der Rest etc. zu unterteilen. Das öffnet die Möglichkeit, kritischer und eben anders zu denken. Wie in der unteren Rezension erwähnt, sind nicht alle Aussagen unumstritten und manches Statement sorgt beim Lesen für stirnrunzeln - aber: es regt zum Nachdenken, sich Beschäftigen und Nachforschen an! Und das an sich ist schon ein sehr wichtiger Schritt - mehr Wissen statt nur Information!

Where do those "facts" come from? How are they presented?
von einer Kundin/einem Kunden am 29.05.2019
Bewertet: Einband: gebundene Ausgabe

Rosling thinks that the statistical data he is using in the book are facts. Many of the data come from the IMF and from the world bank. I don't really think those capitalistic institutes provide really objective data. As Winston Churchill said: The only statistics you can trust are those you falsified yourself. The author cla... Rosling thinks that the statistical data he is using in the book are facts. Many of the data come from the IMF and from the world bank. I don't really think those capitalistic institutes provide really objective data. As Winston Churchill said: The only statistics you can trust are those you falsified yourself. The author claims that in Fukushima nobody died form radioactivity. People were dying from fear of radioactivity. The same claim about the pesticide DDT. Even worse he claims the Vietnam War was not that severe, the country had some longer wars in the history. These statements make me feel sad. One big mistake in this book is the use of the average income to declare the financial state of a country. If there is one rich billionaire living in this country, the average would increase dramatically. Rosling should better use the median income. That means the income, where 50% of the people earn more, and 50% earn less. The median is typically smaller than the average. The so-called facts of this book would look very different then ... The most annoying thing in the book is the use of an exponential scale in the income graphics. If Rosling used a linear scale, then most of the people would live in Level 1, only a few in Levels 2, 3 and 4. Details on this issue can be found in the Web, search for "Factfulness: Building Gapminder Income Mountains" of the Stockholm University.