A Book of Days

A Book of Days

Buch (Gebundene Ausgabe, Englisch)

Fr.36.90

inkl. gesetzl. MwSt.

Beschreibung

Details

Verkaufsrang

9390

Einband

Gebundene Ausgabe

Erscheinungsdatum

15.11.2022

Verlag

Random House LCC US

Seitenzahl

400

Beschreibung

Details

Verkaufsrang

9390

Einband

Gebundene Ausgabe

Erscheinungsdatum

15.11.2022

Verlag

Random House LCC US

Seitenzahl

400

Maße (L/B/H)

18.8/13.9/3.8 cm

Gewicht

678 g

Sprache

Englisch

ISBN

978-0-593-44854-0

Das meinen unsere Kund*innen

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Buch des Jahres, auch im woertlich Sinn!

Peter Jenni aus Le Muids am 06.01.2023

Bewertet: Buch (Gebundene Ausgabe)

Patti Smith bereichert uns mit 365+1 Photos und kurzen Texten dazu fuer ein ganzes Jahr. Viele der Photos sind mit ihrer legendaeren Polaroidkamera aufgenommen, und haben dadurch einen sehr persoenlichen Wert. Patti Smith ist eine ganz grosse Kuenstlerin, bei Weitem nicht nur ein Rockstar vergangener Zeiten, sondern eben auch eine Schriftstellerin mit grosser Kultur. Mein Lieblingsbuch des Jahres 2022.

Buch des Jahres, auch im woertlich Sinn!

Peter Jenni aus Le Muids am 06.01.2023
Bewertet: Buch (Gebundene Ausgabe)

Patti Smith bereichert uns mit 365+1 Photos und kurzen Texten dazu fuer ein ganzes Jahr. Viele der Photos sind mit ihrer legendaeren Polaroidkamera aufgenommen, und haben dadurch einen sehr persoenlichen Wert. Patti Smith ist eine ganz grosse Kuenstlerin, bei Weitem nicht nur ein Rockstar vergangener Zeiten, sondern eben auch eine Schriftstellerin mit grosser Kultur. Mein Lieblingsbuch des Jahres 2022.

Unsere Kund*innen meinen

A Book of Days

von Patti Smith

5.0

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Hello Everybody

On March 20, 2018, the Spring Equinox, I posted my first Instagram entry. My daughter, Jesse, had suggested that I open an Instagram account to distinguish mine from fraudulent ones soliciting in my name. Jesse also felt the platform would suit me, as I write and take pictures every day. She and I created the site together. I wondered how I might signal to the people that it was truly me reaching out to them. I decided upon a straightforward approach: thisispattismith.

I used my own hand as the image for my first venture into the virtual world. The hand is one of the oldest of icons, a direct correspondence between imagination and execution. Healing energy is channeled through our hands. We extend a hand in greeting and service; we raise a hand as a pledge. Ocher handprints, thousands of years old, found stenciled in the Chauvet–Pont d’Arc Cave in southeastern France, were formed by spitting red pigment over a hand pressed against the stone wall to merge with an element of strength or perhaps to signal a prehistoric declaration of self.

Instagram has served as a way to share old and new discoveries, celebrate birthdays, remember the departed, and salute our youth. I write my captions in a notebook or directly on the phone. I would have liked to have had a Polaroid-based site, but as the film has been discontinued, my camera is now a retired witness of former travels. The images in this book are drawn from existing Polaroids, my archive, and the cellphone. A process unique to the twentyfirst century.

Although I miss my camera and the specific atmosphere of the Polaroid image, I appreciate the flexibility of the cellphone. My first inkling of a cellphone’s possible artistic usefulness was through Annie Leibovitz. In 2004 she took an interior shot with her cell, and then printed it out as a small, low-resolution image. She said offhandedly that she thought it would one day be possible to take worthy pictures with a phone. I didn’t consider having a cellphone back then, but we evolve with the times. Mine, acquired in 2010, has enabled me to unite with the exploding collage of our culture.

A Book of Days is a glimpse of how I navigate this culture in my own way. It was inspired by my Instagram but is uniquely its own. Much of it I created during the pandemic, in my room alone, projecting into the future and reflecting the past, family, and a consistent personal aesthetic.

Entries and images are keys to unlocking one’s own thoughts. Each is surrounded with the reverberation of other possibilities. Birthdays acknowledged are prompts for others, including your own. A Paris café is all cafés, just as a gravesite may echo others mourned and remembered. Having experienced much loss, I’ve found solace in frequenting the cemeteries of people I love, and I have visited many, offering my prayers, respect, and gratitude. I am at home with history and tracing the steps of those whose work has inspired me; many entries are that of remembrance.

I have been encouraged in watching my site grow, from the first follower, my daughter, to over one million. This book, a year and a day (for those born on leap day), is offered in gratitude, as a place to be heartened, even in the basest of times. Each day is precious, for we are yet breathing, moved by the way light falls on a high branch, or a morning worktable, or the sculpted headstone of a beloved poet.

Social media, in its twisting of democracy, sometimes courts cruelty, reactionary commentary, misinformation, and nationalism, but it can also serve us. It’s in our hands. The hand that composes a message, smooths a child’s hair, pulls back the arrow and lets it fly. Here are my arrows aiming for the common heart of things. Each attached with a few words, scrappy oracles.

Three hundred and sixty-six ways of saying hello.
  • A Book of Days